• Mangove-canals-Quirimbas
  • Quirimbas National Park
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Quirimbas Island Day Tour

Arimba FishermanQuirimba Island, lies south of Ibo and bears important historical testimony. Initially Quirimba Island was the Capital of the Archipelago and indeed gave the string of thirty two islands its name. Because of repeated attacks from the Arab Sultanate of Zanzibar, the capital was moved to Ibo Island in the mid fifteen hundreds.
Today ruins of colonial occupation still remain on Quirimba Island and it supports fishing village and community on the island.

For the adventurous a one and a half hour walk at low tide takes us through the beautiful mangroves paths to our fascinating neighbouring Quirimba Island. Explore the village and churches where you will learn that Quirimba Island offers more than pristine beaches and tall coconut palms. Some remains of Quirimbas’ original colonial architecture are still visible, making exploring interesting. Learn tales of Arab maritime merchants sailing the seas in colourful dhows and watch the local woman weave Maluane cloth.  Meet some of the legendary Gessner family – a pioneering German family who after the 1st World War made their home on Quirimba and planted and cultivated the vast palm plantation that is still operation today.

At high tide travel ‘home’ to Ibo Island leisurely by boat through the canal that was cut by the slaves in the eighteenth century (boat travel is available both ways).

Just another unique day in Mozambique!

 

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Hi Fiona and Kevin

We returned on Saturday from our wonderful week at the Lodge. We will give some formal feedback and we have posted something on Tripadvisor but I just wanted to thank you personally for ensuring that our wedding anniversary celebration was such a memorable occasion. The special touches of some champagne and cake in addition to the other great meals were much appreciated and your well-trained staff all went out of their way to take good care of us all of the time. It was exactly the experience we were hoping to have.

We also want to commend you on what you have done for the island in general. I trust that it is appreciated and that you are given appropriate recognition for the difference you have made to people’s lives there; but even if it is not always fully acknowledged, I hope that it gives you a lot of satisfaction after the immense effort you must have put in to turn the Lodge into what it is today.

 

Congratulations and best wishes